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Association of genetic variation in mitotic kinases with breast cancer risk

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
Association of genetic variation in mitotic kinases with breast cancer risk
Published in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2009
DOI 10.1007/s10549-009-0404-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xianshu Wang, Zachary S. Fredericksen, Robert A. Vierkant, Matthew L. Kosel, V. Shane Pankratz, James R. Cerhan, Christina Justenhoven, Hiltrud Brauch, Janet E. Olson, Fergus J. Couch

Abstract

An RNAi-based functional screening of mitotic kinases in Drosophila recently identified a number of members of the kinome that are required for normal cell division. Depletion of these kinases resulted in a number of different mitotic abnormalities including spindle malformation, chromosome mis-segregation, centrosome amplification and failure of cytokinesis (Bettencourt-Dias et al. in Nature 432:980-987, 2004). Since mitotic defects are commonly observed in cancer cells, these kinases may contribute to tumor development and/or progression. To investigate whether common genetic variation in the mitotic kinases are associated with breast cancer risk, we genotyped 386 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 44 mitotic kinase genes, in 798 breast cancer cases and 843 unaffected controls from a clinic-based study. A total of 22 SNPs from 13 kinase genes displayed significant associations with breast cancer risk (P(trend) < or = 0.05), including two SNPs from FYN (rs6914091 and rs1465061) that remained of interest after accounting for multiple testing (q = 0.06). These associations were stronger when evaluating cases with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive tumors. In addition, haplotype-based tests identified significant associations with risk for common haplotypes of the MAST2 (P = 0.04) and MAP2K4 (P = 0.006) genes. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms in mitotic kinases that have been implicated in chromosome instability and aneuploidy may contribute to the development of breast cancer.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 30%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Master 4 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 20%
Computer Science 1 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2009.
All research outputs
#594,141
of 3,684,317 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#122
of 921 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,859
of 85,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#7
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,684,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 921 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,541 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.