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Short-Term Prospective Study of Hooking Up Among College Students

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
3 blogs

Citations

dimensions_citation
92 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
Title
Short-Term Prospective Study of Hooking Up Among College Students
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, January 2011
DOI 10.1007/s10508-010-9697-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jesse Owen, Frank D. Fincham, Jon Moore

Abstract

Hook ups are casual sexual encounters (ranging from kissing to intercourse) between two people with no clear mutual expectation of further interactions or a committed relationship. This study utilized a short-term prospective design to examine predictors of hooking up in a sample of young adults (N = 394). Hooking up over the past year, positive reactions to prior hook ups, alcohol use, and loneliness were associated with hooking up over a 4-month period. Alcohol use was a stronger predictor for women than men. Thoughtfulness about relationship transitions and religiosity were significant predictors of hooking up in univariate analyses, but were not significant in multivariate analyses. Young adults who reported more depressive symptoms and feelings of loneliness at Time 1 and subsequently engaged in penetrative hook ups reported fewer depressive symptoms and lower feelings of loneliness at Time 2 as compared to young adults who did not hook up. However, young adults who reported fewer depressive symptoms and were less lonely at Time 1 and engaged in penetrative hook ups over the 4 month period reported more depressive symptoms and greater feelings of loneliness at Time 2 as compared to young adults who did not hook up. Implications for relationship education programs are offered.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 92 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 25%
Student > Master 20 21%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 11%
Other 16 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 44 46%
Social Sciences 28 29%
Unspecified 10 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 7 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2014.
All research outputs
#212,641
of 4,600,446 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#164
of 1,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,794
of 89,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#5
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,600,446 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,395 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,441 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.