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Hyperactivity in Boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A Ubiquitous Core Symptom or Manifestation of Working Memory Deficits?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, December 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
106 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
129 Mendeley
Title
Hyperactivity in Boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A Ubiquitous Core Symptom or Manifestation of Working Memory Deficits?
Published in
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, December 2008
DOI 10.1007/s10802-008-9287-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark D. Rapport, Jennifer Bolden, Michael J. Kofler, Dustin E. Sarver, Joseph S. Raiker, R. Matt Alderson

Abstract

Hyperactivity is currently considered a core and ubiquitous feature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, an alternative model challenges this premise and hypothesizes a functional relationship between working memory (WM) and activity level. The current study investigated whether children's activity level is functionally related to WM demands associated with the domain-general central executive and subsidiary storage/rehearsal components using tasks based on Baddeley's (Working memory, thought, and action. New York: Oxford University Press 2007) WM model. Activity level was objectively measured 16 times per second using wrist- and ankle-worn actigraphs while 23 boys between 8 and 12 years of age completed control tasks and visuospatial/phonological WM tasks of increasing memory demands. All children exhibited significantly higher activity rates under all WM relative to control conditions, and children with ADHD (n = 12) moved significantly more than typically developing children (n = 11) under all conditions. Activity level in all children was associated with central executive but not storage/rehearsal functioning, and higher activity rates exhibited by children with ADHD under control conditions were fully attenuated by removing variance directly related to central executive processes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Italy 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 123 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 22%
Researcher 16 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Unspecified 11 9%
Other 33 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 70 54%
Unspecified 18 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 5%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Other 15 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2016.
All research outputs
#837,453
of 12,320,334 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#71
of 1,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,886
of 141,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#2
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,320,334 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,456 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 141,878 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.