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Congenital prosopagnosia: multistage anatomical and functional deficits in face processing circuitry

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurology, December 2010
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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3 Google+ users

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
Congenital prosopagnosia: multistage anatomical and functional deficits in face processing circuitry
Published in
Journal of Neurology, December 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00415-010-5828-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

V. Dinkelacker, M. Grüter, P. Klaver, T. Grüter, K. Specht, S. Weis, I. Kennerknecht, C. E. Elger, G. Fernandez

Abstract

Face recognition is a primary social skill which depends on a distributed neural network. A pronounced face recognition deficit in the absence of any lesion is seen in congenital prosopagnosia. This study investigating 24 congenital prosopagnosic subjects and 25 control subjects aims at elucidating its neural basis with fMRI and voxel-based morphometry. We found a comprehensive behavioral pattern, an impairment in visual recognition for faces and buildings that spared long-term memory for faces with negative valence. Anatomical analysis revealed diminished gray matter density in the bilateral lingual gyrus, the right middle temporal gyrus, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In most of these areas, gray matter density correlated with memory success. Decreased functional activation was found in the left fusiform gyrus, a crucial area for face processing, and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas activation of the medial prefrontal cortex was enhanced. Hence, our data lend strength to the hypothesis that congenital prosopagnosia is explained by network dysfunction and suggest that anatomic curtailing of visual processing in the lingual gyrus plays a substantial role. The dysfunctional circuitry further encompasses the fusiform gyrus and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which may contribute to their difficulties in long-term memory for complex visual information. Despite their deficits in face identity recognition, processing of emotion related information is preserved and possibly mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex. Congenital prosopagnosia may, therefore, be a blueprint of differential curtailing in networks of visual cognition.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 6%
Germany 2 2%
France 2 2%
New Zealand 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 75 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 22%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Professor 8 9%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 11 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 47%
Neuroscience 10 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Computer Science 4 5%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,162,203
of 11,618,931 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurology
#160
of 2,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,872
of 133,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurology
#3
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,618,931 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,201 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,446 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.