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What is the role of mothers in the acquisition of termite-fishing behaviors in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)?

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, September 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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125 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
153 Mendeley
Title
What is the role of mothers in the acquisition of termite-fishing behaviors in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)?
Published in
Animal Cognition, September 2005
DOI 10.1007/s10071-005-0002-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf

Abstract

This paper explores the role of maternal influences on the acquisition of a tool-using task in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in order to build on and complement previous work done in captivity. Young chimpanzees show a long period of offspring dependency on mothers and it is during this period that offspring learn several important skills, especially how to and on what to forage. At Gombe National Park, one skill that is acquired during dependency is termite-fishing, a complex behavior that involves inserting a tool made from the surrounding vegetation into a termite mound and extracting the termites that attack and cling to the tool. All chimpanzees observed at Gombe have acquired the termite-fishing skill by the age of 5.5 years. Since the mother is the primary source of information throughout this time period, I investigated the influence of mothers' individual termite-fishing characteristics on their offsprings' speed of acquisition and proficiency at the skill once acquired. Mother's time spent alone or with maternal family members, which is highly correlated to time spent termite-fishing, was positively correlated to offspring's acquisition of critical elements of the skill. I also investigated the specific types of social interactions that occur between mothers and offspring at the termite mound and found that mothers are highly tolerant to offspring, even when the behavior of the offspring may disrupt the termite-fishing attempt. However, no active facilitation by mothers of offsprings' attempts were observed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 153 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
Israel 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 144 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 23%
Researcher 31 20%
Student > Master 24 16%
Student > Bachelor 23 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 12 8%
Other 23 15%
Unknown 5 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 76 50%
Psychology 29 19%
Social Sciences 16 10%
Environmental Science 4 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 13 8%
Unknown 12 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2017.
All research outputs
#321,913
of 12,222,940 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#96
of 902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,668
of 138,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#3
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 138,749 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.