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Piagetian object permanence and its development in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius)

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, January 2007
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Title
Piagetian object permanence and its development in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius)
Published in
Animal Cognition, January 2007
DOI 10.1007/s10071-006-0063-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paolo Zucca, Nadia Milos, Giorgio Vallortigara

Abstract

Object permanence in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) was investigated using a complete version of the Uzgiris and Hunt scale 1. Nine hand-raised jays were studied, divided into two groups according to their different developmental stages (experiment 1, older jays: 2-3 months old, n = 4; experiment 2, younger jays: 15 days old, n = 5). In the first experiment, we investigated whether older jays could achieve piagetian stage 6 of object permanence. Tasks were administered in a fixed sequence (1-15) according to the protocols used in other avian species. The aim of the second experiment was to check whether testing very young jays before their development of "neophobia" could influence the achievement times of piagetian stages. Furthermore, in this experiment tasks were administered randomly to investigate whether the jays' achievement of stage 6 follows a fixed sequence related to the development of specific cognitive abilities. All jays tested in experiments 1 and 2 fully achieved piagetian stage 6 and no "A not B" errors were observed. Performance on visible displacement tasks was better than performance on invisible ones. The results of experiment 2 show that "neophobia" affected the response of jays in terms of achievement times; the older jays in experiment 1 took longer to pass all the tasks when compared with the younger, less neophobic, jays in experiment 2. With regard to the achieving order, jays followed a fixed sequence of acquisition in experiment 2, even if tasks were administered randomly, with the exception of one subject. The results of these experiments support the idea that piagetian stages of cognitive development exist in avian species and that they progress through relatively fixed sequences.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Canada 1 1%
China 1 1%
Hungary 1 1%
Unknown 75 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 16%
Student > Master 12 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 51%
Psychology 22 27%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2010.
All research outputs
#10,835,047
of 12,222,940 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#854
of 902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,586
of 138,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#22
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,940 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 138,749 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.