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Pediatric emergency medicine point-of-care ultrasound: summary of the evidence

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Ultrasound Journal, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 180)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
104 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
119 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
215 Mendeley
Title
Pediatric emergency medicine point-of-care ultrasound: summary of the evidence
Published in
Critical Ultrasound Journal, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13089-016-0049-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer R. Marin, Alyssa M. Abo, Alexander C. Arroyo, Stephanie J. Doniger, Jason W. Fischer, Rachel Rempell, Brandi Gary, James F. Holmes, David O. Kessler, Samuel H. F. Lam, Marla C. Levine, Jason A. Levy, Alice Murray, Lorraine Ng, Vicki E. Noble, Daniela Ramirez-Schrempp, David C. Riley, Turandot Saul, Vaishali Shah, Adam B. Sivitz, Ee Tein Tay, David Teng, Lindsey Chaudoin, James W. Tsung, Rebecca L. Vieira, Yaffa M. Vitberg, Resa E. Lewiss

Abstract

The utility of point-of-care ultrasound is well supported by the medical literature. Consequently, pediatric emergency medicine providers have embraced this technology in everyday practice. Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a policy statement endorsing the use of point-of-care ultrasound by pediatric emergency medicine providers.  To date, there is no standard guideline for the practice of point-of-care ultrasound for this specialty. This document serves as an initial step in the detailed "how to" and description of individual point-of-care ultrasound examinations.  Pediatric emergency medicine providers should refer to this paper as reference for published research, objectives for learners, and standardized reporting guidelines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 104 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 214 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 44 20%
Student > Postgraduate 26 12%
Researcher 21 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 14 7%
Other 53 25%
Unknown 41 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 122 57%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 5%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Other 12 6%
Unknown 57 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 76. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2022.
All research outputs
#424,545
of 21,269,509 outputs
Outputs from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#5
of 180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,644
of 315,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#2
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,269,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 180 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,077 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.