↓ Skip to main content

Destabilising automobility? The emergent mobilities of generation Y

Overview of attention for article published in Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, November 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
Title
Destabilising automobility? The emergent mobilities of generation Y
Published in
Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s13280-016-0841-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Debbie Hopkins

Abstract

This paper uses empirical material gathered with young adults in New Zealand to examine a potential sustainability transition-in-practice. It draws from two frameworks; the actor-centred Energy Cultures Framework to explore mobility behaviours, and the multi-level perspective (MLP) to situate behaviour change within the socio-technical transitions literature. The MLP has traditionally been used to analyse historical transitions (e.g. from the horse and cart to the motor vehicle), but in this paper, it is used to explore an on-going change trend; the emergent mobilities of young adults who appear to be aspiring for different types of mobility. A series of mobility trends are described, which emerged from a programme of qualitative interviews (n = 51). The material culture, norms and practices that constitute these trends are articulated. These are then considered through the lens of the MLP. The evidence points to emergent trends of multimodality that, if leveraged upon and supported, could contribute to a systemic sustainability transition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 29%
Researcher 6 14%
Unspecified 5 12%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Other 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 11 26%
Unspecified 7 17%
Engineering 4 10%
Psychology 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Other 14 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,046,264
of 12,484,416 outputs
Outputs from Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment
#632
of 837 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,697
of 281,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment
#22
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,484,416 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 837 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.