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Elevated prefrontal myo-inositol and choline following breast cancer chemotherapy

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Imaging and Behavior, March 2013
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
Title
Elevated prefrontal myo-inositol and choline following breast cancer chemotherapy
Published in
Brain Imaging and Behavior, March 2013
DOI 10.1007/s11682-013-9228-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shelli R. Kesler, Christa Watson, Della Koovakkattu, Clement Lee, Ruth O’Hara, Misty L. Mahaffey, Jeffrey S. Wefel

Abstract

Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for cognitive dysfunction, which reduces quality of life. Neuroimaging studies provide critical insights regarding the mechanisms underlying these cognitive deficits as well as potential biologic targets for interventions. We measured several metabolite concentrations using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as cognitive performance in 19 female breast cancer survivors and 17 age-matched female controls. Women with breast cancer were all treated with chemotherapy. Results indicated significantly increased choline (Cho) and myo-inositol (mI) with correspondingly decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cho and NAA/mI ratios in the breast cancer group compared to controls. The breast cancer group reported reduced executive function and memory, and subjective memory ability was correlated with mI and Cho levels in both groups. These findings provide preliminary evidence of an altered metabolic profile that increases our understanding of neurobiologic status post-breast cancer and chemotherapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Russia 1 2%
Unknown 54 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Master 8 14%
Researcher 7 13%
Other 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 12 21%
Unknown 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Neuroscience 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2014.
All research outputs
#7,224,372
of 12,517,134 outputs
Outputs from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#327
of 714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,151
of 145,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#9
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.