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Crayfish bury their own exuviae: a newly discovered behavioral pattern in decapods

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, September 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
Crayfish bury their own exuviae: a newly discovered behavioral pattern in decapods
Published in
SpringerPlus, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40064-016-3343-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miloš Buřič, Martin Fořt, Martin Bláha, Lukáš Veselý, Pavel Kozák, Antonín Kouba

Abstract

Invertebrates are a very diverse group of animals, showing a wide spectrum of life strategies and adaptations. They often exhibit very complex behavioural and social patterns. In crayfish, the largest freshwater invertebrates, we found a new behavioural pattern, burying their own exuviae after moulting. Such a pattern may be an as yet unrecognized type of hoarding or caching. The buried exuvia is exhumed after 2 or 3 days (when the crayfish body is no longer as soft) and consumed. This behaviour is probably self-protective (hiding the mark of a helpless prey), as well as having mineral storage reasons. Such complex behavioural patterns in invertebrates present new challenges for future research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 28%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 16%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Master 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 44%
Environmental Science 8 32%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Chemistry 1 4%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2020.
All research outputs
#15,265,264
of 22,699,621 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#932
of 1,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,710
of 322,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#84
of 155 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,699,621 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,852 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 155 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.