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Health promoting practices and personal lifestyle behaviors of Brazilian health professionals

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Readers on

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330 Mendeley
Title
Health promoting practices and personal lifestyle behaviors of Brazilian health professionals
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3778-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen D. Hidalgo, Grégore I. Mielke, Diana C. Parra, Felipe Lobelo, Eduardo J. Simões, Grace O. Gomes, Alex A. Florindo, Mário Bracco, Lenildo Moura, Ross C. Brownson, Michael Pratt, Luiz R. Ramos, Pedro C. Hallal

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine the lifestyle behaviors and health promoting practices of physicians, nurses, and community health workers in Brazil. A random sample of primary health care units in Brazil was selected, and a pretested questionnaire was administered via phone interviews, in 2011, to 182 physicians, 347 nurses, and 269 community health workers, totaling 798 health professionals. The total initial sample included 1600 eligible health professionals. Variables measured included physical activity, alcohol intake, hours of sleep, diet, and perceived self-efficacy to provide preventive counseling on related lifestyle behaviors. More than 25 % of physicians, nurses, and community health workers reported eating 0-2 portions of fruits and vegetables per day. In terms of cervical and breast cancer, nurses reported to be 'very prepared' to advise patients on these topics more frequently than physicians. The prevalence of smoking ranged from 4.9 % among nurses to 7.4 % among community health workers. The proportion of physical inactivity ranged from 40.3 % among nurses to 52.1 % among community health workers. A reasonably high proportion of physicians, nurses, and community health workers report not engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviors that impact chronic diseases, thus, they may be less likely to encourage such behaviors in their patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 330 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 330 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 6%
Unspecified 18 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 5%
Researcher 15 5%
Student > Bachelor 15 5%
Other 33 10%
Unknown 213 65%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 29 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 8%
Unspecified 25 8%
Sports and Recreations 10 3%
Social Sciences 9 3%
Other 16 5%
Unknown 213 65%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2016.
All research outputs
#6,534,249
of 8,605,855 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,114
of 7,123 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,715
of 246,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#165
of 200 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,605,855 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,123 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 200 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.