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Neural auditory intensity discrimination during naturalistic listening: a brain decoding study

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Structure & Function, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

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6 Mendeley
Title
Neural auditory intensity discrimination during naturalistic listening: a brain decoding study
Published in
Brain Structure & Function, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00429-016-1324-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hu, Xintao, Guo, Lei, Han, Junwei, Guo, Christine Cong, Xintao Hu, Lei Guo, Junwei Han, Christine Cong Guo

Abstract

Neural discrimination of auditory intensity is one of the fundamental questions in human auditory perception. Human neuroimaging studies have demonstrated specific neural activations during intensity discrimination tasks. The detailed functional anatomy, however, remains elusive. Most of the existing studies examined the entire auditory cortex as a whole, neglecting the potential functional differentiation within the auditory cortex. Moreover, these previous results based on controlled auditory stimuli might not necessarily extend to the neural mechanism of natural auditory processing. In this study, we propose a novel brain decoding method to examine neural encoding of intensity discrimination during naturalistic auditory experience. Here, we used publically available dataset ( http://studyforrest.org ) in which high resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was acquired when the participants freely listened to the audio-version of the movie "Forrest Gump". We found the sensitivity and accuracy of intensity discrimination in the auditory cortex critically depend on the divergences in intensity levels, yielding a sigmoidal relationship. Furthermore, anatomical subdivisions of auditory cortex revealed great functional diversity and lateralization in intensity discrimination. While bilateral activations were observed in primary auditory cortex, enhanced left-lateralization effects were shown in inferior frontal gyrus, anterior middle temporal gyrus and temporal-occipital junction. Our findings underscore the value of naturalistic paradigms in mapping auditory processing in the brain: naturalistic paradigm contains enriched and complex natural sounds, which not only improve the ecological validity but also alleviate the discrepancies caused by the differences in stimulus types and task designs in previous studies. The multidisciplinary methodology we developed here provides an analytical framework for studying neural encoding of complex auditory stimuli.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 50%
Professor 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 2 33%
Psychology 2 33%
Engineering 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,353,894
of 11,817,206 outputs
Outputs from Brain Structure & Function
#333
of 857 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,272
of 258,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Structure & Function
#11
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,817,206 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 857 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.