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Dual origins of the Japanese: common ground for hunter-gatherer and farmer Y chromosomes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Human Genetics, November 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 1,157)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
21 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
168 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Dual origins of the Japanese: common ground for hunter-gatherer and farmer Y chromosomes
Published in
Journal of Human Genetics, November 2005
DOI 10.1007/s10038-005-0322-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael F. Hammer, Tatiana M. Karafet, Hwayong Park, Keiichi Omoto, Shinji Harihara, Mark Stoneking, Satoshi Horai

Abstract

Historic Japanese culture evolved from at least two distinct migrations that originated on the Asian continent. Hunter-gatherers arrived before land bridges were submerged after the last glacial maximum (>12,000 years ago) and gave rise to the Jomon culture, and the Yayoi migration brought wet rice agriculture from Korea beginning approximately 2,300 years ago. A set of 81 Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was used to trace the origins of Paleolithic and Neolithic components of the Japanese paternal gene pool, and to determine the relative contribution of Jomon and Yayoi Y chromosome lineages to modern Japanese. Our global sample consisted of >2,500 males from 39 Asian populations, including six populations sampled from across the Japanese archipelago. Japanese populations were characterized by the presence of two major (D and O) and two minor (C and N) clades of Y chromosomes, each with several sub-lineages. Haplogroup D chromosomes were present at 34.7% and were distributed in a U-shaped pattern with the highest frequency in the northern Ainu and southern Ryukyuans. In contrast, haplogroup O lineages (51.8%) were distributed in an inverted U-shaped pattern with a maximum frequency on Kyushu. Coalescent analyses of Y chromosome short tandem repeat diversity indicated that haplogroups D and C began their expansions in Japan approximately 20,000 and approximately 12,000 years ago, respectively, while haplogroup O-47z began its expansion only approximately 4,000 years ago. We infer that these patterns result from separate and distinct genetic contributions from both the Jomon and the Yayoi cultures to modern Japanese, with varying levels of admixture between these two populations across the archipelago. The results also support the hypothesis of a Central Asian origin of Jomonese ancestors, and a Southeast Asian origin of the ancestors of the Yayoi, contra previous models based on morphological and genetic evidence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 3 2%
United States 2 2%
Australia 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Saudi Arabia 1 <1%
Unknown 114 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 38 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 23%
Student > Bachelor 15 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 14 11%
Student > Master 6 5%
Other 21 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 59 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 13%
Social Sciences 15 12%
Linguistics 7 6%
Arts and Humanities 5 4%
Other 20 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2019.
All research outputs
#844,463
of 13,043,869 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Human Genetics
#40
of 1,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,368
of 144,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Human Genetics
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,043,869 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 144,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.