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Socio-economic position over the life course and all-cause, and circulatory diseases mortality at age 50–87 years: results from a Swedish birth cohort

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Epidemiology, February 2013
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Title
Socio-economic position over the life course and all-cause, and circulatory diseases mortality at age 50–87 years: results from a Swedish birth cohort
Published in
European Journal of Epidemiology, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10654-013-9777-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gita Devi Mishra, Flaminia Chiesa, Anna Goodman, Bianca De Stavola, Ilona Koupil

Abstract

Both child and adult socio-economic position (SEP) predict adult mortality, but little is known about the variation in the impact of SEP across the life course. The Uppsala Birth Cohort Study is a representative birth cohort born 1915-1929 in Uppsala, Sweden. For the 5,138 males and 5,069 females alive in 1980, SEP was available at birth; in adulthood (age 31-45); and in later life (age 51-65). Follow-up for mortality (all-cause, and circulatory disease) was from 1980 to 2002. To test which life course model best described the association between SEP and mortality, we compared the fit of a series of nested Cox proportional hazards regression models (representing either the critical, accumulation or sensitive period models) with a fully saturated model. For all-cause mortality in both genders, the sensitive period model best described the influence of SEP across the life course with a heightened effect in later adult life (males: Hazard Ratio (95 % CI) for advantaged SEP: 0.89 (0.81-0.97) at birth, 0.90 (0.81-0.98) in adulthood, 0.74 (0.67-0.82) in later life; females: 0.87 (0.78-0.98), 0.95 (0.86-1.06), 0.73 (0.64-0.83)). The effect of SEP on circulatory diseases mortality in males was cumulative (HR: 0.84 (0.80-0.87) per unit time in advantaged SEP). For circulatory disease mortality among females, a sensitive period model was selected due to SEP in later adult life (HR: 0.64 (0.52-0.80)). These findings suggest that reducing inequality throughout the life course might reduce all-cause and circulatory disease mortality.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 40 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 28%
Researcher 11 26%
Student > Master 10 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 19 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 28%
Unspecified 8 19%
Psychology 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2013.
All research outputs
#9,846,132
of 12,327,627 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Epidemiology
#914
of 1,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,834
of 140,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Epidemiology
#18
of 20 outputs
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