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Social Stigma in Diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in The Patient, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 303)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
104 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
Title
Social Stigma in Diabetes
Published in
The Patient, January 2013
DOI 10.1007/s40271-012-0001-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jasmin Schabert, Jessica L. Browne, Kylie Mosely, Jane Speight

Abstract

A comprehensive understanding of the social and psychological impact of diabetes mellitus is important for informing policy and practice. One potentially significant, yet under-researched, issue is the social stigma surrounding diabetes. This narrative review draws on literature about health-related stigma in diabetes and other chronic conditions in order to develop a framework for understanding diabetes-related stigma. Our review of the literature found that people who do not have diabetes assume that diabetes is not a stigmatized condition. In contrast, people with diabetes report that stigma is a significant concern to them, experienced across many life domains, e.g., in the workplace, in relationships. The experience of diabetes-related stigma has a significant negative impact on many aspects of psychological well-being and may also result in sub-optimal clinical outcomes for people with diabetes. We propose a framework that highlights the causes (attitudes of blame, feelings of fear and disgust, and the felt need to enforce social norms and avoid disease), experiences (being judged, rejected, and discriminated against), and consequences (e.g., distress, poorer psychological well-being, and sub-optimal self-care) of diabetes-related stigma and also identifies potential mitigating strategies to reduce diabetes-related stigma and/or enhance coping and resilience amongst people with diabetes. The systematic investigation of the experiences, causes, and consequences of diabetes-related stigma is an urgent research priority.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 99 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 15%
Researcher 10 10%
Unspecified 8 8%
Other 24 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 29 28%
Social Sciences 20 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 19%
Unspecified 10 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Other 16 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 67. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2018.
All research outputs
#241,233
of 13,130,318 outputs
Outputs from The Patient
#2
of 303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,425
of 144,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Patient
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,130,318 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 303 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 144,161 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them