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The Role of Fear-Related Behaviors in the 2013–2016 West Africa Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak

Overview of attention for article published in Current Psychiatry Reports, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
Title
The Role of Fear-Related Behaviors in the 2013–2016 West Africa Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak
Published in
Current Psychiatry Reports, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11920-016-0741-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

James M. Shultz, Janice L. Cooper, Florence Baingana, Maria A. Oquendo, Zelde Espinel, Benjamin M. Althouse, Louis Herns Marcelin, Sherry Towers, Maria Espinola, Clyde B. McCoy, Laurie Mazurik, Milton L. Wainberg, Yuval Neria, Andreas Rechkemmer

Abstract

The 2013-2016 West Africa Ebola virus disease pandemic was the largest, longest, deadliest, and most geographically expansive outbreak in the 40-year interval since Ebola was first identified. Fear-related behaviors played an important role in shaping the outbreak. Fear-related behaviors are defined as "individual or collective behaviors and actions initiated in response to fear reactions that are triggered by a perceived threat or actual exposure to a potentially traumatizing event. FRBs modify the future risk of harm." This review examines how fear-related behaviors were implicated in (1) accelerating the spread of Ebola, (2) impeding the utilization of life-saving Ebola treatment, (3) curtailing the availability of medical services for treatable conditions, (4) increasing the risks for new-onset psychological distress and psychiatric disorders, and (5) amplifying the downstream cascades of social problems. Fear-related behaviors are identified for each of these outcomes. Particularly notable are behaviors such as treating Ebola patients in home or private clinic settings, the "laying of hands" on Ebola-infected individuals to perform faith-based healing, observing hands-on funeral and burial customs, foregoing available life-saving treatment, and stigmatizing Ebola survivors and health professionals. Future directions include modeling the onset, operation, and perpetuation of fear-related behaviors and devising strategies to redirect behavioral responses to mass threats in a manner that reduces risks and promotes resilience.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Singapore 1 1%
Unknown 67 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 15 22%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 24%
Social Sciences 7 10%
Psychology 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,290,125
of 13,906,652 outputs
Outputs from Current Psychiatry Reports
#240
of 929 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,001
of 267,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Psychiatry Reports
#6
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,906,652 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 929 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,465 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.