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Finding their voices again: a media project offers a floor for vulnerable patients, clients and the socially deprived

Overview of attention for article published in Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, February 2013
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
Finding their voices again: a media project offers a floor for vulnerable patients, clients and the socially deprived
Published in
Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s11019-013-9468-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ralf Stutzki, Markus Weber, Stella Reiter-Theil

Abstract

'DU bist Radio' (DBR) is an award winning [DBR has been awarded with the "Catholic Media Award of the German Bishops Conference, Prädikat WERTvoll" (2011), the Suisse "Media Prize Aargau/Solothurn" (2010), the German "Alternative Media Award" (2009) and was nominated for the "Prix Europa" (2009)] monthly radio format that goes on air on three Swiss radio stations. The purpose of this program which was first broadcast in 2009 is the development of a new media format which--without applying any journalistic (or other) filter and influence--conveys authenticity of expression amongst society's most vulnerable fellow citizens such as patients, clients and the socially deprived. So-called marginal groups are encouraged to speak for themselves, as a possible paradigm case for encouraging the inclusion of patients' and relatives' "unfiltered" voices in general and in clinical ethics as well. Before handing over the microphone to the groups in focus, a team of journalists, educated in medical ethics, over a period of 4 days, teaches them on-site radio skills and craft. Once this task is completed and the actual production of the broadcast begins, the media crew does not exert any influence whatsoever on the content of the 1-h program. Thus, the final product is solely created and accounted for by the media-inexperienced participants, leading to unforeseen and often surprising results. It is discussed that the DBR approach of fostering authenticity of expression can serve as an enhancement to today's respect and autonomy oriented field of medical ethics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 25%
Student > Postgraduate 4 20%
Student > Master 4 20%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 20%
Psychology 2 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Other 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2013.
All research outputs
#9,446,375
of 12,343,216 outputs
Outputs from Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy
#261
of 361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,238
of 139,362 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy
#11
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,343,216 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 361 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,362 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.