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Mental Disorders, Religion and Spirituality 1990 to 2010: A Systematic Evidence-Based Review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Religion & Health, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 689)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
165 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
238 Mendeley
Title
Mental Disorders, Religion and Spirituality 1990 to 2010: A Systematic Evidence-Based Review
Published in
Journal of Religion & Health, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10943-013-9691-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raphael M. Bonelli, Harold G. Koenig

Abstract

Religion/spirituality has been increasingly examined in medical research during the past two decades. Despite the increasing number of published studies, a systematic evidence-based review of the available data in the field of psychiatry has not been done during the last 20 years. The literature was searched using PubMed (1990-2010). We examined original research on religion, religiosity, spirituality, and related terms published in the top 25 % of psychiatry and neurology journals according to the ISI journals citation index 2010. Most studies focused on religion or religiosity and only 7 % involved interventions. Among the 43 publications that met these criteria, thirty-one (72.1 %) found a relationship between level of religious/spiritual involvement and less mental disorder (positive), eight (18.6 %) found mixed results (positive and negative), and two (4.7 %) reported more mental disorder (negative). All studies on dementia, suicide, and stress-related disorders found a positive association, as well as 79 and 67 % of the papers on depression and substance abuse, respectively. In contrast, findings from the few studies in schizophrenia were mixed, and in bipolar disorder, indicated no association or a negative one. There is good evidence that religious involvement is correlated with better mental health in the areas of depression, substance abuse, and suicide; some evidence in stress-related disorders and dementia; insufficient evidence in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and no data in many other mental disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 238 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 2%
Portugal 2 <1%
Malaysia 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 221 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 31 13%
Student > Bachelor 29 12%
Researcher 26 11%
Other 68 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 101 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 49 21%
Social Sciences 29 12%
Unspecified 24 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 4%
Other 26 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2019.
All research outputs
#523,412
of 13,092,471 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Religion & Health
#20
of 689 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,890
of 143,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Religion & Health
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,092,471 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 689 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 143,252 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them