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Last Hired, First Fired? Black-White Unemployment and the Business Cycle

Overview of attention for article published in Demography, January 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
61 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Last Hired, First Fired? Black-White Unemployment and the Business Cycle
Published in
Demography, January 2010
DOI 10.1353/dem.0.0086
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth A. Couch, Robert Fairlie

Abstract

Studies have tested the claim that blacks are the last hired during periods of economic growth and the first fired in recessions by examining the movement of relative unemployment rates over the business cycle. Any conclusion drawn from this type of analysis must be viewed as tentative because cyclical movements in the underlying transitions into and out of unemployment are not examined. Using Current Population Survey data matched across adjacent months from 1989-2004, this article provides the first detailed examination of labor market transitions for prime-age black and white men to test the last hired, first fired hypothesis. Considerable evidence is presented that blacks are the first fired as the business cycle weakens. However no evidence is found that blacks are the last hired. Instead, blacks appear to be initially hired from the ranks of the unemployed early in the business cycle and later are drawn from nonparticipation. The narrowing of the racial unemployment gap near the peak of the business cycle is driven by a reduction in the rate of job loss for blacks rather than increases in hiring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 8%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 43 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 44%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 26 54%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 12 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2019.
All research outputs
#337,945
of 13,935,840 outputs
Outputs from Demography
#106
of 1,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,447
of 275,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Demography
#6
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,935,840 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,445 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,295 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.