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Media Portrayal of Mental Illness and its Treatments

Overview of attention for article published in CNS Drugs, January 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 994)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
91 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
184 Mendeley
Title
Media Portrayal of Mental Illness and its Treatments
Published in
CNS Drugs, January 2006
DOI 10.2165/00023210-200620020-00002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heather Stuart

Abstract

This article reviews dominant media portrayals of mental illness, the mentally ill and mental health interventions, and examines what social, emotional and treatment-related effects these may have. Studies consistently show that both entertainment and news media provide overwhelmingly dramatic and distorted images of mental illness that emphasise dangerousness, criminality and unpredictability. They also model negative reactions to the mentally ill, including fear, rejection, derision and ridicule. The consequences of negative media images for people who have a mental illness are profound. They impair self-esteem, help-seeking behaviours, medication adherence and overall recovery. Mental health advocates blame the media for promoting stigma and discrimination toward people with a mental illness. However, the media may also be an important ally in challenging public prejudices, initiating public debate, and projecting positive, human interest stories about people who live with mental illness. Media lobbying and press liaison should take on a central role for mental health professionals, not only as a way of speaking out for patients who may not be able to speak out for themselves, but as a means of improving public education and awareness. Also, given the consistency of research findings in this field, it may now be time to shift attention away from further cataloguing of media representations of mental illness to the more challenging prospect of how to use the media to improve the life chances and recovery possibilities for the one in four people living with mental disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 177 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 51 28%
Student > Master 38 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 15%
Researcher 20 11%
Unspecified 12 7%
Other 36 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 68 37%
Social Sciences 37 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 15%
Unspecified 13 7%
Arts and Humanities 12 7%
Other 27 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 90. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2019.
All research outputs
#190,604
of 13,779,708 outputs
Outputs from CNS Drugs
#7
of 994 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,418
of 266,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age from CNS Drugs
#2
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,779,708 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 994 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,696 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.