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Differences Between Landline and Mobile Phone Users in Sexual Behavior Research

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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10 Mendeley
Title
Differences Between Landline and Mobile Phone Users in Sexual Behavior Research
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, September 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10508-016-0859-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul B. Badcock, Kent Patrick, Anthony M. A. Smith, Judy M. Simpson, Darren Pennay, Chris E. Rissel, Richard O. de Visser, Andrew E. Grulich, Juliet Richters

Abstract

This study investigated differences between the demographic characteristics, participation rates (i.e., agreeing to respond to questions about sexual behavior), and sexual behaviors of landline and mobile phone samples in Australia. A nationally representative sample of Australians aged 18 years and over was recruited via random digit dialing in December 2011 to collect data via computer-assisted telephone interviews. A total of 1012 people (370 men, 642 women) completed a landline interview and 1002 (524 men, 478 women) completed a mobile phone interview. Results revealed that telephone user status was significantly related to all demographic variables: gender, age, educational attainment, area of residence, country of birth, household composition, and current ongoing relationship status. In unadjusted analyses, telephone status was also associated with women's participation rates, participants' number of other-sex sexual partners in the previous year, and women's lifetime sexual experience. However, after controlling for significant demographic factors, telephone status was only independently related to women's participation rates. Post hoc analyses showed that significant, between-group differences for all other sexual behavior outcomes could be explained by demographic covariates. Results also suggested that telephone status may be associated with participation bias in research on sexual behavior. Taken together, these findings highlight the importance of sampling both landline and mobile phone users to improve the representativeness of sexual behavior data collected via telephone interviews.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Other 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Other 3 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 4 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%
Computer Science 1 10%
Unspecified 1 10%
Other 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,230,547
of 12,321,765 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#1,207
of 2,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,542
of 264,499 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#40
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,321,765 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,308 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.6. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,499 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.