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Comparative efficacy of nonhormonal drugs on menopausal hot flashes

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, July 2016
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Title
Comparative efficacy of nonhormonal drugs on menopausal hot flashes
Published in
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00228-016-2090-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lujin Li, Ling Xu, Junyi Wu, Lidan Dong, Shuiyu Zhao, Qingshan Zheng

Abstract

The effects of nonhormonal drugs on menopausal hot flashes are still not well quantified. We therefore did a model-based meta-analysis (MBMA) to quantitate and compare the efficacy features of nonhormonal drugs on menopausal hot flashes. Literature was searched in the public databases to extract data of clinical trials on nonhormonal drugs, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), gabapentin, clonidine, and soy isoflavones. Pharmacodynamic models were used for the quantitative analysis of each drug. Thirty-nine studies were included in the analysis. The results revealed a classic pharmacodynamic maximal effect (Emax) model could describe the time course of hot-flash reduction by nonhormonal drugs. After deducting placebo effects, the Emax of SSRIs/SNRIs, gabapentin, clonidine, and soy isoflavones was 13.9 %, 14.8 %, 18.5 %, and 25.0 %, respectively. The time to achieve half of the maximal effect (ET50) of SSRIs/SNRIs, gabapentin, clonidine, and soy isoflavones was 0.18 weeks, 0 weeks, 0 weeks, and 11.6 weeks, respectively. The results showed that SSRIs/SNRIs, gabapentin, and clonidine had a rapid onset, which could reach the maximum effect immediately. However, the onset of soy isoflavones was very slow, and a duration of 16.6 weeks was needed to surpass the efficacy of paroxetine (a type of SSRIs). The information provided in this study can be used as valuable supplementary information for treatment guidelines of nonhormonal drugs on menopausal hot flashes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 29%
Student > Master 7 29%
Unspecified 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 25%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Unspecified 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2016.
All research outputs
#10,837,583
of 12,226,226 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
#1,597
of 1,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,358
of 263,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
#23
of 25 outputs
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