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Esophageal and transpulmonary pressure in the clinical setting: meaning, usefulness and perspectives

Overview of attention for article published in Intensive Care Medicine, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
104 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
249 Mendeley
Title
Esophageal and transpulmonary pressure in the clinical setting: meaning, usefulness and perspectives
Published in
Intensive Care Medicine, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00134-016-4400-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tommaso Mauri, Takeshi Yoshida, Giacomo Bellani, Ewan C. Goligher, Guillaume Carteaux, Nuttapol Rittayamai, Francesco Mojoli, Davide Chiumello, Lise Piquilloud, Salvatore Grasso, Amal Jubran, Franco Laghi, Sheldon Magder, Antonio Pesenti, Stephen Loring, Luciano Gattinoni, Daniel Talmor, Lluis Blanch, Marcelo Amato, Lu Chen, Laurent Brochard, Jordi Mancebo

Abstract

Esophageal pressure (Pes) is a minimally invasive advanced respiratory monitoring method with the potential to guide management of ventilation support and enhance specific diagnoses in acute respiratory failure patients. To date, the use of Pes in the clinical setting is limited, and it is often seen as a research tool only. This is a review of the relevant technical, physiological and clinical details that support the clinical utility of Pes. After appropriately positioning of the esophageal balloon, Pes monitoring allows titration of controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation to achieve personalized protective settings and the desired level of patient effort from the acute phase through to weaning. Moreover, Pes monitoring permits accurate measurement of transmural vascular pressure and intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure and facilitates detection of patient-ventilator asynchrony, thereby supporting specific diagnoses and interventions. Finally, some Pes-derived measures may also be obtained by monitoring electrical activity of the diaphragm. Pes monitoring provides unique bedside measures for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of acute respiratory failure patients. Including Pes monitoring in the intensivist's clinical armamentarium may enhance treatment to improve clinical outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 249 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 241 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 49 20%
Other 43 17%
Student > Postgraduate 29 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 9%
Unspecified 20 8%
Other 86 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 190 76%
Unspecified 29 12%
Engineering 9 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 2%
Other 8 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,004,599
of 13,444,807 outputs
Outputs from Intensive Care Medicine
#592
of 3,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,162
of 222,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Intensive Care Medicine
#7
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,444,807 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,473 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,844 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.