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Association of semen cytokines with reactive oxygen species and histone transition abnormalities

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics, June 2016
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Title
Association of semen cytokines with reactive oxygen species and histone transition abnormalities
Published in
Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10815-016-0756-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lu Jiang, Ting Zheng, Jun Huang, Jinhua Mo, Hua Zhou, Min Liu, Xingcheng Gao, Bolan Yu

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships among reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation, histone transition, and seminal cytokine concentrations. Total levels of ROS in semen samples from 6560 men were measured. From this sample, 118 cases with high ROS and 106 controls were recruited. Basic semen parameters and histone-to-protamine ratios were analyzed, 400 semen cytokine and receptor alterations were assayed by protein chip, and finally 18 cytokines were validated in each sample using a Bio-Plex Cytokine assay. The results showed that the seminal ROS concentration was associated with abnormalities in the sperm histone transition. Compared with controls, 93 cytokines had significant alterations in the high ROS cases, with 14 of them further verified in individual samples. The concentrations of CXCL5, CXCL16, CXCL8, IL-1b, IL-10, CSF3, CCL3, and TNF-α were significantly correlated with the histone transition ratio. In addition, IL-16 showed significantly different concentrations in controls, normal semen with high ROS levels, and abnormal semen with high ROS levels. Semen ROS are associated with abnormalities in sperm histone transition. CXCL5, CXCL8, IL-16, CCL8, CCL22, CCL20, CXCL16, IL-1B, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, CSF3, CCL3, CCL4, and TNF-α all have elevated concentrations in semen with high ROS levels. These data might help to explain the mechanisms behind the increase in the levels of ROS and seminal cytokines and their relationship with defective spermatogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 39%
Student > Bachelor 5 28%
Student > Master 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Materials Science 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,858,293
of 12,342,096 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics
#557
of 811 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,694
of 264,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics
#11
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,342,096 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 811 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.