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Warburg, me and Hexokinase 2: Multiple discoveries of key molecular events underlying one of cancers’ most common phenotypes, the “Warburg Effect”, i.e., elevated glycolysis in the presence of oxygen

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Bioenergetics & Biomembranes, September 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 337)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
patent
5 patents
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
292 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
250 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
Title
Warburg, me and Hexokinase 2: Multiple discoveries of key molecular events underlying one of cancers’ most common phenotypes, the “Warburg Effect”, i.e., elevated glycolysis in the presence of oxygen
Published in
Journal of Bioenergetics & Biomembranes, September 2007
DOI 10.1007/s10863-007-9094-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter L. Pedersen

Abstract

As a new faculty member at The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, the author began research on cancer in 1969 because this frequently fatal disease touched many whom he knew. He was intrigued with its viscous nature, the failure of all who studied it to find a cure, and also fascinated by the pioneering work of Otto Warburg, a biochemical legend and Nobel laureate. Warburg who died 1 year later in 1970 had shown in the 1920s that the most striking biochemical phenotype of cancers is their aberrant energy metabolism. Unlike normal tissues that derive most of their energy (ATP) by metabolizing the sugar glucose to carbon dioxide and water, a process that involves oxygen-dependent organelles called "mitochondria", Warburg showed that cancers frequently rely less on mitochondria and obtain as much as 50% of their ATP by metabolizing glucose directly to lactic acid, even in the presence of oxygen. This frequent phenotype of cancers became known as the "Warburg effect", and the author of this review strongly believed its understanding would facilitate the discovery of a cure. Following in the final footsteps of Warburg and caught in the midst of an unpleasant anti-Warburg, anti-metabolic era, the author and his students/collaborators began quietly to identify the key molecular events involved in the "Warburg effect". Here, the author describes via a series of sequential discoveries touching five decades how despite some impairment in the respiratory capacity of malignant tumors, that hexokinase 2 (HK-2), its mitochondrial receptor (VDAC), and the gene that encodes HK-2 (HK-2 gene) play the most pivotal and direct roles in the "Warburg effect". They discovered also that like a "Trojan horse" the simple lactic acid analog 3-bromopyruvate selectively enters the cells of cancerous animal tumors that exhibit the "Warburg effect" and quickly dissipates their energy (ATP) production factories (i.e., glycolysis and mitochondria) resulting in tumor destruction without harm to the animals.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 250 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
India 3 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 230 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 70 28%
Researcher 53 21%
Student > Bachelor 33 13%
Student > Master 28 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 6%
Other 50 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 123 49%
Medicine and Dentistry 41 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 15%
Unspecified 16 6%
Chemistry 10 4%
Other 22 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2018.
All research outputs
#906,985
of 12,673,944 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Bioenergetics & Biomembranes
#6
of 337 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,867
of 249,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Bioenergetics & Biomembranes
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,673,944 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 337 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them