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Age-related differences in rapid muscle activation after rate of force development training of the elbow flexors

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, December 2004
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Title
Age-related differences in rapid muscle activation after rate of force development training of the elbow flexors
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, December 2004
DOI 10.1007/s00221-004-2127-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin K. Barry, Geoffrey E. Warman, Richard G. Carson

Abstract

In young adults, improvements in the rate of force development as a result of resistance training are accompanied by increases in neural drive in the very initial phase of muscle activation. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if older adults also exhibit similar adaptations in response to rate of force development (RFD) training. Eight young (21-35 years) and eight older (60-79 years) adults were assessed during the production of maximum rapid contractions, before and after four weeks of progressive resistance training for the elbow flexors. Young and older adults exhibited significant increases (P<0.01) in peak RFD, of 25.6% and 28.6% respectively. For both groups the increase in RFD was accompanied by an increase in the root mean square (RMS) amplitude and in the rate of rise (RER) in the electromyogram (EMG) throughout the initial 100 ms of activation. For older adults, however, this training response was only apparent in the brachialis and brachioradialis muscles. This response was not observed in surface EMG recorded from the biceps brachii muscle during either RFD testing or throughout training, nor was it observed in the pronator teres muscle. The minimal adaptations observed for older adults in the bifunctional muscles biceps brachii and pronator teres are considered to indicate a compromise of the neural adaptations older adults might experience in response to resistance training.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Serbia 1 1%
Qatar 1 1%
Norway 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 78 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 24%
Student > Master 16 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 12%
Unspecified 7 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 26 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 44 51%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 15%
Unspecified 9 10%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 13 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2019.
All research outputs
#10,400,080
of 13,043,924 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#1,674
of 2,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,388
of 262,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#30
of 58 outputs
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