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Oncogenic effects of miR-10b in glioblastoma stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuro-Oncology, January 2013
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1 tweeter

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43 Mendeley
Title
Oncogenic effects of miR-10b in glioblastoma stem cells
Published in
Journal of Neuro-Oncology, January 2013
DOI 10.1007/s11060-013-1047-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fadila Guessous, Melissa Alvarado-Velez, Lukasz Marcinkiewicz, Ying Zhang, Jungeun Kim, Simon Heister, Benjamin Kefas, Jakub Godlewski, David Schiff, Benjamin Purow, Roger Abounader

Abstract

MicroRNAs and cancer stem cells have emerged as critical players in glioblastoma, one of the deadliest human cancers. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of microRNA-10b in glioblastoma cells and stem cells. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed a correlation between high miR-10b levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. We measured the levels of miR-10b and found that it is upregulated in human glioblastoma tissues, glioblastoma cell and stem cell lines as compared to normal human tissues or astrocytes. Inhibition of miR-10b with a specific antagomir inhibited the proliferation of glioblastoma established and stem cell lines. Inhibition of miR-10b strongly reduced cell invasion and migration in glioblastoma cell and stem cell lines while overexpression of miR-10b induced cell migration and invasion. We also investigated several predicted targets of miR-10b but could not verify any of them experimentally. Additionally, miR-10b inhibition significantly decreased the in vivo growth of stem cell-derived orthotopic GBM xenografts. Altogether, our findings confirm the oncogenic effects of miR-10b in GBM cells and show for the first time a role of this microRNA in GBM stem cells. Targeting miR-10b might therefore inhibit glioblastoma stem cells, which are thought to be at the origin of glioblastoma and to contribute its recurrence and resistance to therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 42 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 30%
Student > Master 7 16%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Unspecified 4 9%
Other 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Unspecified 7 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 12%
Computer Science 2 5%
Other 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2013.
All research outputs
#9,836,815
of 12,317,289 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuro-Oncology
#1,127
of 1,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,397
of 284,264 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuro-Oncology
#10
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,317,289 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,806 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,264 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.