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A computational neuroanatomy for motor control

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, February 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
574 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
942 Mendeley
citeulike
10 CiteULike
Title
A computational neuroanatomy for motor control
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, February 2008
DOI 10.1007/s00221-008-1280-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Reza Shadmehr, John W. Krakauer

Abstract

The study of patients to infer normal brain function has a long tradition in neurology and psychology. More recently, the motor system has been subject to quantitative and computational characterization. The purpose of this review is to argue that the lesion approach and theoretical motor control can mutually inform each other. Specifically, one may identify distinct motor control processes from computational models and map them onto specific deficits in patients. Here we review some of the impairments in motor control, motor learning and higher-order motor control in patients with lesions of the corticospinal tract, the cerebellum, parietal cortex, the basal ganglia, and the medial temporal lobe. We attempt to explain some of these impairments in terms of computational ideas such as state estimation, optimization, prediction, cost, and reward. We suggest that a function of the cerebellum is system identification: to build internal models that predict sensory outcome of motor commands and correct motor commands through internal feedback. A function of the parietal cortex is state estimation: to integrate the predicted proprioceptive and visual outcomes with sensory feedback to form a belief about how the commands affected the states of the body and the environment. A function of basal ganglia is related to optimal control: learning costs and rewards associated with sensory states and estimating the "cost-to-go" during execution of a motor task. Finally, functions of the primary and the premotor cortices are related to implementing the optimal control policy by transforming beliefs about proprioceptive and visual states, respectively, into motor commands.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 942 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 30 3%
United Kingdom 17 2%
Canada 10 1%
Germany 9 <1%
Switzerland 8 <1%
Netherlands 6 <1%
France 6 <1%
Japan 5 <1%
Belgium 4 <1%
Other 23 2%
Unknown 824 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 284 30%
Researcher 180 19%
Student > Master 129 14%
Student > Bachelor 62 7%
Professor 60 6%
Other 227 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 171 18%
Engineering 159 17%
Neuroscience 157 17%
Psychology 151 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 93 10%
Other 211 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2014.
All research outputs
#725,942
of 13,597,380 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#53
of 2,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#702,090
of 12,924,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#52
of 2,293 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,597,380 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,309 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 12,924,494 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,293 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.