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Social Influences on Cyberbullying Behaviors Among Middle and High School Students

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Youth & Adolescence, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
152 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
339 Mendeley
Title
Social Influences on Cyberbullying Behaviors Among Middle and High School Students
Published in
Journal of Youth & Adolescence, January 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10964-012-9902-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sameer Hinduja, Justin W. Patchin

Abstract

Cyberbullying is a problem affecting a meaningful proportion of youth as they embrace online communication and interaction. Research has identified a number of real-world negative ramifications for both the targets and those who bully. During adolescence, many behavioral choices are influenced and conditioned by the role of major socializing agents, including friends, family, and adults at school. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which peers, parents, and educators influence the cyberbullying behaviors of adolescents. To explore this question, data were analyzed from a random sample of approximately 4,400 sixth through twelfth grade students (49% female; 63% nonwhite) from thirty-three schools in one large school district in the southern United States. Results indicate that cyberbullying offending is associated with perceptions of peers behaving similarly, and the likelihood of sanction by adults. Specifically, youth who believed that many of their friends were involved in bullying and cyberbullying were themselves more likely to report cyberbullying behaviors. At the same time, respondents who believed that the adults in their life would punish them for cyberbullying were less likely to participate. Implications for schools and families are discussed with the goal of mitigating this behavior and its negative outcomes among adolescent populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 339 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 1%
Spain 3 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 322 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 73 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 63 19%
Student > Bachelor 59 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 32 9%
Researcher 24 7%
Other 59 17%
Unknown 29 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 93 27%
Psychology 92 27%
Computer Science 29 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 22 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 4%
Other 50 15%
Unknown 38 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2018.
All research outputs
#531,675
of 12,576,527 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#84
of 1,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,221
of 256,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#2
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,576,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,111 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,162 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.