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Physical activity and mammographic density in a cohort of postmenopausal Norwegian women; a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, December 2012
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Title
Physical activity and mammographic density in a cohort of postmenopausal Norwegian women; a cross-sectional study
Published in
SpringerPlus, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/2193-1801-1-75
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samera Azeem Qureshi, Merete Ellingjord-Dale, Solveig Hofvind, Anna H Wu, Giske Ursin

Abstract

Mammographic density (MD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer and may represent a useful intermediate marker for breast cancer risk. Physical activity (PA) is known to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. If PA is associated with MD then this would be useful for breast cancer prevention studies. MD was assessed on digitized mammograms using a computer assisted method (Madena) in 2218 postmenopausal women. A questionnaire assessed PA, by asking about the duration and intensity of light, moderate, strenuous PA/week. We used multivariate linear regression models to estimate least square means of percent MD by total and intensity of PA with adjustment for confounders. The mean age (± s.d) was 58.4 (±5.3) and mean BMI was 24.6 (±4.6). We observed a statistically significant inverse association between total PA and MD in the over-weight (BMI = 25.0-29.9) women, where mean MD among women with highest activity (>360 mins/week) was 12.6% (95%CI; 11.2%-14.0%), while among women with no activity it was 15.9% (95 CI; 13.6%-18.2%, p for trend = 0.04). There was no association in the other BMI strata. MD was 12.1% (11.2%-13.0%) in the highest group (> 180 mins/week) of moderate/strenuous activity and in the no activity group 14.8% (14.2%-15.5%, p for trend = 0.001) in the over-weight women. There was no association between light PA and MD in all women combined or in any other BMI strata. We found some evidence of an inverse association between PA and MD among overweight women.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Luxembourg 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Professor 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 8 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Mathematics 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 10 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2012.
All research outputs
#20,176,348
of 22,689,790 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#1,461
of 1,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#248,352
of 280,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#27
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,689,790 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.