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Autism Prevalence Following Prenatal Exposure to Hurricanes and Tropical Storms in Louisiana

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, July 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
156 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
155 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Autism Prevalence Following Prenatal Exposure to Hurricanes and Tropical Storms in Louisiana
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, July 2007
DOI 10.1007/s10803-007-0414-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dennis K. Kinney, Andrea M. Miller, David J. Crowley, Emerald Huang, Erika Gerber

Abstract

Hurricanes and tropical storms served as natural experiments for investigating whether autism is associated with exposure to stressful events during sensitive periods of gestation. Weather service data identified severe storms in Louisiana from 1980 to 1995 and parishes hit by storm centers during this period. Autism prevalences in different cohorts were calculated using anonymous data on birth dates and parishes of children diagnosed with autism in the state mental health system, together with corresponding census data on all live births in Louisiana. Prevalence increased in dose-response fashion with severity of prenatal storm exposure, especially for cohorts exposed near the middle or end of gestation (p < 0.001). Results complement other evidence that factors disrupting development during sensitive gestational periods may contribute to autism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Unknown 150 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 23%
Researcher 29 19%
Student > Bachelor 25 16%
Student > Master 22 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 6%
Other 34 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 14%
Unspecified 16 10%
Neuroscience 11 7%
Other 28 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2018.
All research outputs
#824,183
of 13,297,120 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#447
of 3,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,567
of 248,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#9
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,297,120 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,260 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,961 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.