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Sexual Priming, Gender Stereotyping, and Likelihood to Sexually Harass: Examining the Cognitive Effects of Playing a Sexually-Explicit Video Game

Overview of attention for article published in Sex Roles, January 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 1,720)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
91 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
reddit
1 Redditor
video
5 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Sexual Priming, Gender Stereotyping, and Likelihood to Sexually Harass: Examining the Cognitive Effects of Playing a Sexually-Explicit Video Game
Published in
Sex Roles, January 2010
DOI 10.1007/s11199-009-9695-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yao MZ, Mahood C, Linz D, Mike Z. Yao, Chad Mahood, Daniel Linz

Abstract

The present study examines the short-term cognitive effects of playing a sexually explicit video game with female "objectification" content on male players. Seventy-four male students from a university in California, U.S. participated in a laboratory experiment. They were randomly assigned to play either a sexually-explicit game or one of two control games. Participants' cognitive accessibility to sexual and sexually objectifying thoughts was measured in a lexical decision task. A likelihood-to-sexually-harass scale was also administered. Results show that playing a video game with the theme of female "objectification" may prime thoughts related to sex, encourage men to view women as sex objects, and lead to self-reported tendencies to behave inappropriately towards women in social situations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 91 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 7%
Germany 3 2%
Spain 2 1%
Brazil 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 136 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 26%
Student > Master 30 19%
Student > Bachelor 29 18%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 29 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 72 46%
Social Sciences 38 24%
Computer Science 12 8%
Arts and Humanities 11 7%
Unspecified 9 6%
Other 16 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 104. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2018.
All research outputs
#103,113
of 9,725,367 outputs
Outputs from Sex Roles
#42
of 1,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,872
of 302,591 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sex Roles
#1
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,725,367 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,720 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,591 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.