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Interactions between endogenous and exogenous attention during vigilance

Overview of attention for article published in Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, July 2009
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Title
Interactions between endogenous and exogenous attention during vigilance
Published in
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, July 2009
DOI 10.3758/app.71.5.1042
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine A. MacLean, Stephen R. Aichele, David A. Bridwell, George R. Mangun, Ewa Wojciulik, Clifford D. Saron

Abstract

The ability to remain vigilant over long periods of time is critical for many everyday tasks, but controlled studies of visual sustained attention show that performance declines over time when observers are required to respond to rare stimulus events (targets) occurring in a sequence of standard stimulus events (nontargets). When target discrimination is perceptually difficult, this vigilance decrement manifests as a decline in perceptual sensitivity. We examined whether sudden-onset stimuli could act as exogenous attentional cues to improve sensitivity during a traditional sustained attention task. Sudden-onset cues presented immediately before each stimulus attenuated the sensitivity decrement, but only when stimulus timing (the interstimulus interval [ISI]) was constant. When stimulus timing was variable, exogenous cues increased overall sensitivity but did not prevent performance decline. Finally, independent of the effects of sudden onsets, a constant ISI improved vigilance performance. Our results demonstrate that exogenous attention enhances perceptual sensitivity during vigilance performance, but that this effect is dependent on observers' being able to predict the timing of stimulus events. Such a result indicates a strong interaction between endogenous and exogenous attention during vigilance. We relate our findings to a resource model of vigilance, as well as to theories of endogenous and exogenous attention over short time periods.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
Germany 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 122 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 25%
Student > Master 28 20%
Researcher 26 19%
Student > Bachelor 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 26 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 78 57%
Neuroscience 11 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 8%
Unspecified 8 6%
Engineering 8 6%
Other 21 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,308,521
of 8,314,034 outputs
Outputs from Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
#1,021
of 1,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,604
of 251,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
#21
of 30 outputs
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