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“Marseilleviridae”, a new family of giant viruses infecting amoebae

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Virology, November 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
Title
“Marseilleviridae”, a new family of giant viruses infecting amoebae
Published in
Archives of Virology, November 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00705-012-1537-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philippe Colson, Isabelle Pagnier, Niyaz Yoosuf, Ghislain Fournous, Bernard La Scola, Didier Raoult

Abstract

The family "Marseilleviridae" is a new proposed taxon for giant viruses that infect amoebae. Its first member, Acanthamoeba polyphaga marseillevirus (APMaV), was isolated in 2007 by culturing on amoebae a water sample collected from a cooling tower in Paris, France. APMaV has an icosahedral shape with a diameter of ≈250 nm. Its genome is a double-stranded circular DNA that is 368,454 base pairs (bp) in length. The genome has a GC content of 44.7 % and is predicted to encode 457 proteins. Phylogenetic reconstructions showed that APMaV belongs to a new viral family among nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses, a group of viruses that also includes Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) and the other members of the family Mimiviridae as well as the members of the families Poxviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Iridoviridae, Ascoviridae, and Asfarviridae. In 2011, Acanthamoeba castellanii lausannevirus (ACLaV), another close relative of APMaV, was isolated from river water in France. The ACLaV genome is 346,754 bp in size and encodes 450 genes, among which 320 have an APMaV protein as the closest homolog. Two other giant viruses closely related to APMaV and ACLaV have been recovered in our laboratory from a freshwater sample and a human stool sample using an amoebal co-culture method. The only currently identified hosts for "marseilleviruses" are Acanthamoeba spp. The prevalence of these viruses in the environment and in animals and humans remains to be determined.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 3%
France 1 2%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 60 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 28%
Researcher 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Other 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 57%
Unspecified 12 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 July 2017.
All research outputs
#3,271,790
of 12,222,476 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Virology
#451
of 2,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,749
of 278,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Virology
#3
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,476 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,846 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,769 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.