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End-inspiratory pause prolongation in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: effects on gas exchange and mechanics

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
Title
End-inspiratory pause prolongation in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: effects on gas exchange and mechanics
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13613-016-0183-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hernan Aguirre-Bermeo, Indalecio Morán, Maurizio Bottiroli, Stefano Italiano, Francisco José Parrilla, Eugenia Plazolles, Ferran Roche-Campo, Jordi Mancebo

Abstract

End-inspiratory pause (EIP) prolongation decreases dead space-to-tidal volume ratio (Vd/Vt) and PaCO2. We do not know the physiological benefits of this approach to improve respiratory system mechanics in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients when mild hypercapnia is of no concern. The investigation was conducted in an intensive care unit of a university hospital, and 13 ARDS patients were included. The study was designed in three phases. First phase, baseline measurements were taken. Second phase, the EIP was prolonged until one of the following was achieved: (1) EIP of 0.7 s; (2) intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure ≥1 cmH2O; or (3) inspiratory-expiratory ratio 1:1. Third phase, the Vt was decreased (30 mL every 30 min) until PaCO2 equal to baseline was reached. FiO2, PEEP, airflow and respiratory rate were kept constant. EIP was prolonged from 0.12 ± 0.04 to 0.7 s in all patients. This decreased the Vd/Vt and PaCO2 (0.70 ± 0.07 to 0.64 ± 0.08, p < 0.001 and 54 ± 9 to 50 ± 8 mmHg, p = 0.001, respectively). In the third phase, the decrease in Vt (from 6.3 ± 0.8 to 5.6 ± 0.8 mL/Kg PBW, p < 0.001) allowed to decrease plateau pressure and driving pressure (24 ± 3 to 22 ± 3 cmH2O, p < 0.001 and 13.4 ± 3.6 to 10.9 ± 3.1 cmH2O, p < 0.001, respectively) and increased respiratory system compliance from 29 ± 9 to 32 ± 11 mL/cmH2O (p = 0.001). PaO2 did not significantly change. Prolonging EIP allowed a significant decrease in Vt without changes in PaCO2 in passively ventilated ARDS patients. This produced a significant decrease in plateau pressure and driving pressure and significantly increased respiratory system compliance, which suggests less overdistension and less dynamic strain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 41 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 11 24%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Engineering 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2021.
All research outputs
#1,872,098
of 19,476,606 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#203
of 896 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,337
of 281,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,476,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 896 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,423 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them