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Impact of resection and systemic therapy on the survival of patients with brain metastasis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuro-Oncology, August 2016
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Title
Impact of resection and systemic therapy on the survival of patients with brain metastasis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma
Published in
Journal of Neuro-Oncology, August 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11060-016-2238-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

YueJun Du, Sascha Pahernik, Boris Hadaschik, Dogu Teber, Stephan Duensing, Dirk Jäger, Markus Hohenfellner, Carsten Grüllich

Abstract

Patients with brain metastasis (BM) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are associated with poor prognosis. Between 1990 and 2015, data of consecutive RCC patients with BM were retrospectively analyzed from a urologic oncologic database. The treatment outcome was evaluated by overall survival (OS), which was defined as interval from initial diagnosis of BM to death or last follow-up. Statistical analyses of clinical and pathological variables were performed using Cox regression and the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 116 RCC patients with BM were included. Median time from initial diagnosis of RCC to BM was 15.8 months (95 % CI 11.6-20.0). Median OS after diagnosis of brain metastases of the whole cohort was 5.8 months (95 % CI 4.3-7.2). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, age and histology of non-clear cell RCC were associated with poorer outcome, while targeted therapy (n = 26) (OS 9.9 months, 95 % CI 3.3-16.5) and BM resection (n = 33) (OS 24.7 months, 95 % CI 4-40) were associated with better survival. Furthermore, patients who underwent both targeted therapy and BM resection (n = 5) had the best outcome with median OS of 52.4 months. In conclusion, BM from RCC is associated with a poor oncological outcome. Furthermore, age and histology of non-clear cell RCC are risk factors for poor prognosis. Patients with resectable BM may comprise a better prognostic group. Here, a better OS for resected than unresected patients was observed, which warrants BM resection. A combined modality approach of resection and targeted therapy appears to further improve the outcome of these patients while additional radiation seems to add no benefit.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 23%
Other 2 15%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Professor 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Neuroscience 2 15%
Unspecified 1 8%
Unknown 5 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2016.
All research outputs
#10,914,983
of 12,317,289 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuro-Oncology
#1,444
of 1,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,534
of 265,780 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuro-Oncology
#50
of 75 outputs
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