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Weight loss interventions for overweight and obese adolescents: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Weight loss interventions for overweight and obese adolescents: a systematic review
Published in
Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, August 2016
DOI 10.1007/s40519-016-0309-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raquel de Melo Boff, Ronald Patrick Araujo Liboni, Igor Pacheco de Azevedo Batista, Lauren Heineck de Souza, Margareth da Silva Oliveira

Abstract

To determine what factors contribute to the efficacy of non-drug treatments designed to promote weight loss in overweight and obese adolescents. Data sources Medline/PubMed; Psychinfo; EMBASE; Web of Science (ISI); and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Study selection Randomized clinical trials of treatments for obesity and overweight in adolescents aged 10-19 years with a minimum duration of 2 months. Data extraction 115 of the 12,948 publications retrieved met eligibility criteria and 26 were included in the final sample. Period of extraction January 2004 to November 2014. The Delphi list was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the studies (M = 5.58, SD = 1.027). There was considerable variability between the interventions, but they were all multifactorial, with components such as nutritional education, physical activity, family support and psychological therapy. The number of contacts with subjects during the course of the intervention was a predictor of treatment efficacy when the groups were compared. Limitations This systematic review was limited to trials reported in English and by the lack of methodological rigor and shortcomings in reporting in the studies reviewed. Multidisciplinary interventions including family support and guided behavior modification appear to be effective methods of reducing BMI in overweight and obese adolescents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 92 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 22%
Student > Bachelor 14 15%
Unspecified 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 30 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 22 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 18%
Psychology 17 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 15%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Other 16 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,602,409
of 12,538,691 outputs
Outputs from Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
#195
of 489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,828
of 261,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
#9
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,691 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 489 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,865 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.