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The relationship between endogenous thymidine concentrations and [18F]FLT uptake in a range of preclinical tumour models

Overview of attention for article published in EJNMMI Research, August 2016
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Title
The relationship between endogenous thymidine concentrations and [18F]FLT uptake in a range of preclinical tumour models
Published in
EJNMMI Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13550-016-0218-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathrin Heinzmann, Davina Jean Honess, David Yestin Lewis, Donna-Michelle Smith, Christopher Cawthorne, Heather Keen, Sandra Heskamp, Sonja Schelhaas, Timothy Howard Witney, Dmitry Soloviev, Kaye Janine Williams, Andreas Hans Jacobs, Eric Ofori Aboagye, John Richard Griffiths, Kevin Michael Brindle

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F] fluorothymidine ([(18)F]FLT)) uptake depends on endogenous tumour thymidine concentration. The purpose of this study was to investigate tumour thymidine concentrations and whether they correlated with [(18)F]FLT uptake across a broad spectrum of murine cancer models. A modified liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was used to determine endogenous thymidine concentrations in plasma and tissues of tumour-bearing and non-tumour bearing mice and rats. Thymidine concentrations were determined in 22 tumour models, including xenografts, syngeneic and spontaneous tumours, from six research centres, and a subset was compared for [(18)F]FLT uptake, described by the maximum and mean tumour-to-liver uptake ratio (TTL) and SUV. The LC-MS/MS method used to measure thymidine in plasma and tissue was modified to improve sensitivity and reproducibility. Thymidine concentrations determined in the plasma of 7 murine strains and one rat strain were between 0.61 ± 0.12 μM and 2.04 ± 0.64 μM, while the concentrations in 22 tumour models ranged from 0.54 ± 0.17 μM to 20.65 ± 3.65 μM. TTL at 60 min after [(18)F]FLT injection, determined in 14 of the 22 tumour models, ranged from 1.07 ± 0.16 to 5.22 ± 0.83 for the maximum and 0.67 ± 0.17 to 2.10 ± 0.18 for the mean uptake. TTL did not correlate with tumour thymidine concentrations. Endogenous tumour thymidine concentrations alone are not predictive of [(18)F]FLT uptake in murine cancer models.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 50%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Professor 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Lecturer 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 17%
Chemistry 3 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Engineering 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2016.
All research outputs
#7,585,374
of 8,748,067 outputs
Outputs from EJNMMI Research
#121
of 191 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,871
of 257,149 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EJNMMI Research
#2
of 2 outputs
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