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Socio-economic characterisation of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) growers and date value chains in Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, August 2016
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Title
Socio-economic characterisation of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) growers and date value chains in Pakistan
Published in
SpringerPlus, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40064-016-2855-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ghayoor Fatima, Iqrar Ahmad Khan, Andreas Buerkert

Abstract

Increasing food production to feed its rapidly growing population is a major policy goal of Pakistan. The production of traditional staples such as rice (Oryza sativa L.) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has been intensified in many regions, but not in remote, drought-ridden areas. In these arid, marginal environments dates and their by-products are an option to complement staples given their high nutritive value and storability. To fill knowledge gaps about the role of date palm in the household (HH) income of rural communities and the structure of date value chains, this project studied date palm production across six districts in four provinces of Pakistan. During 2012-2013 a total of 170 HHs were interviewed with a structured questionnaire using a snowball sampling approach. The results showed that most of the HH were headed by males (99 %) who were married (74 %) and often illiterate (40 %). Agriculture was the main occupation of date palm growers (56 %), while a few coupled agricultural activities with business (17 %) or extra-farm employment opportunities (government 9 %; private sector 8 %). Date sales contributed >50 % to the total income of 39 % of HH and 90-100 % to 24 % of HH. Overall farmers grew a total of 39 date palm cultivars and cultivated an average of 409 ± 559 mature date palms. The majority of the respondents sold dates to commission agents (35 %), contractors (22 %) and wholesalers (21 %), while 28 % of HH cultivated date palms only for self-consumption. Date palm growers had only limited knowledge about high quality date cultivars, optimized farm management and about effective post-harvest conservation. Changes in extension and marketing efforts are needed to allow farmers to better exploit value chains in date thereby reaping higher benefits from improved market access to secure their often marginal income.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Student > Master 10 14%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Unspecified 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 17 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 21%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Unspecified 5 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 7%
Engineering 4 6%
Other 17 24%
Unknown 19 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,258,143
of 8,247,986 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#1,073
of 1,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,665
of 253,919 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#90
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,247,986 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.