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Co-ingestion of carbohydrate with leucine-enriched essential amino acids does not augment acute postexercise muscle protein synthesis in a strenuous exercise-induced hypoinsulinemic state

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

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4 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
Title
Co-ingestion of carbohydrate with leucine-enriched essential amino acids does not augment acute postexercise muscle protein synthesis in a strenuous exercise-induced hypoinsulinemic state
Published in
SpringerPlus, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40064-016-2736-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiroyuki Kato, Hiromi Suzuki, Yoshiko Inoue, Tetsuya Takimoto, Katsuya Suzuki, Hisamine Kobayashi

Abstract

Strenuous exercise following overnight fasting increases fat oxidation during exercise, which can modulate training adaptation. However, such exercise induces muscle protein catabolism by decreasing blood insulin concentrations and increasing amino acid oxidation during the exercise. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids (LEAAs) enhance muscle protein synthesis (MPS) at rest and after exercise. However, it remains to be clarified if the co-ingestion of carbohydrate with LEAAs induces an additional increase in MPS, particularly in a hypoinsulinemic state induced by strenuous exercise. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were made to perform strenuous jump exercise (height 35 cm, 200 jumps, 3-s intervals), after which they ingested distilled water and 1 g/kg LEAAs with or without 1 g/kg of glucose. The fractional synthesis rate was determined by measuring the incorporation of l-[ring-(2)H5]-phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein. Immediately after the exercise, plasma insulin concentration was significantly lower than that at the basal level. Co-ingestion of glucose with LEAAs alleviated the reduction in plasma insulin concentration, while LEAA ingestion alone did not. LEAA administration with or without glucose led to a higher MPS compared with water administration (P < 0.05). However, the co-ingestion of glucose with LEAAs did not induce further increases in MPS compared with LEAA ingestion alone. Thus, the co-ingestion of glucose with LEAAs does not additionally increase MPS under a strenuous exercise-induced hypoinsulinemic state when glucose is co-ingested with a dose of LEAAs that maximally stimulates MPS.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 25%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 4 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 8 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2017.
All research outputs
#3,890,189
of 13,575,463 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#353
of 1,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,614
of 263,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#24
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,575,463 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,755 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.