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Bedside assessment of the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on lung inflation and recruitment by the helium dilution technique and electrical impedance tomography

Overview of attention for article published in Intensive Care Medicine, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
Title
Bedside assessment of the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on lung inflation and recruitment by the helium dilution technique and electrical impedance tomography
Published in
Intensive Care Medicine, August 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00134-016-4467-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tommaso Mauri, Nilde Eronia, Cecilia Turrini, Marta Battistini, Giacomo Grasselli, Roberto Rona, Carlo Alberto Volta, Giacomo Bellani, Antonio Pesenti

Abstract

Higher positive end-expiratory pressure might induce lung inflation and recruitment, yielding enhanced regional lung protection. We measured positive end-expiratory pressure-related lung volume changes by electrical impedance tomography and by the helium dilution technique. We also used electrical impedance tomography to assess the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on regional determinants of ventilator-induced lung injury. A prospective randomized crossover study was performed on 20 intubated adult patients: 12 with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and 8 with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Each patient underwent protective controlled ventilation at lower (7 [7, 8] cmH2O) and higher (12 [12, 13] cmH2O) positive end-expiratory pressures. At the end of each phase, we collected ventilation, helium dilution, and electrical impedance tomography data. Positive end-expiratory pressure-induced changes in lung inflation and recruitment measured by electrical impedance tomography and helium dilution showed close correlations (R (2) = 0.78, p < 0.001 and R (2) = 0.68, p < 0.001, respectively) but with relatively variable limits of agreement. At higher positive end-expiratory pressure, recruitment was evident in all lung regions (p < 0.01) and heterogeneity of tidal ventilation distribution was reduced by increased tidal volume distending the dependent lung (p < 0.001); in the non-dependent lung, on the other hand, compliance decreased (p < 0.001) and tidal hyperinflation significantly increased (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of ARDS patients (but not in the whole study population) tidal hyperinflation in the dependent lung regions decreased at higher positive end-expiratory pressure (p = 0.05), probably indicating higher potential for recruitment. Close correlations exist between bedside assessment of positive end-expiratory pressure-induced changes in lung inflation and recruitment by the helium dilution and electrical impedance tomography techniques. Higher positive end-expiratory pressure exerts mixed effects on the regional determinants of ventilator-induced lung injury; these merit close monitoring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Unknown 55 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 14%
Researcher 8 14%
Unspecified 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 22 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 84%
Unspecified 7 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2016.
All research outputs
#2,926,192
of 12,226,048 outputs
Outputs from Intensive Care Medicine
#1,184
of 3,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,896
of 265,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Intensive Care Medicine
#30
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,226,048 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,135 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,775 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.