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Effects of caffeine, sleep loss, and stress on cognitive performance and mood during U.S. Navy SEAL training

Overview of attention for article published in Psychopharmacology, November 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 4,155)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
23 tweeters
patent
4 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
299 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
395 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Effects of caffeine, sleep loss, and stress on cognitive performance and mood during U.S. Navy SEAL training
Published in
Psychopharmacology, November 2002
DOI 10.1007/s00213-002-1217-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Harris Lieberman, William Tharion, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, Karen Speckman, Richard Tulley

Abstract

When humans are acutely exposed to multiple stressors, cognitive performance is substantially degraded. Few practical strategies are available to sustain performance under such conditions. This study examined whether moderate doses of caffeine would reduce adverse effects of sleep deprivation and exposure to severe environmental and operational stress on cognitive performance. Volunteers were 68 U.S. Navy Sea-Air-Land (SEAL) trainees, randomly assigned to receive either 100, 200, or 300 mg caffeine or placebo in capsule form after 72 h of sleep deprivation and continuous exposure to other stressors. Cognitive tests administered included scanning visual vigilance, four-choice visual reaction time, a matching-to-sample working memory task and a repeated acquisition test of motor learning and memory. Mood state, marksmanship, and saliva caffeine were also assessed. Testing was conducted 1 and 8 h after treatment. Sleep deprivation and environmental stress adversely affected performance and mood. Caffeine, in a dose-dependent manner, mitigated many adverse effects of exposure to multiple stressors. Caffeine (200 and 300 mg) significantly improved visual vigilance, choice reaction time, repeated acquisition, self-reported fatigue and sleepiness with the greatest effects on tests of vigilance, reaction time, and alertness. Marksmanship, a task that requires fine motor coordination and steadiness, was not affected by caffeine. The greatest effects of caffeine were present 1 h post-administration, but significant effects persisted for 8 h. Even in the most adverse circumstances, moderate doses of caffeine can improve cognitive function, including vigilance, learning, memory, and mood state. When cognitive performance is critical and must be maintained during exposure to severe stress, administration of caffeine may provide a significant advantage. A dose of 200 mg appears to be optimal under such conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 395 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 1%
Australia 2 <1%
India 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Uganda 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 375 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 102 26%
Student > Master 74 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 51 13%
Researcher 40 10%
Unspecified 35 9%
Other 93 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 100 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 13%
Unspecified 51 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 48 12%
Sports and Recreations 43 11%
Other 102 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 141. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2018.
All research outputs
#90,544
of 12,481,741 outputs
Outputs from Psychopharmacology
#27
of 4,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#743
of 142,847 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychopharmacology
#1
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,481,741 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 142,847 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.