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Prevalence of bacterial resistance within an eco-agricultural system in Hangzhou, China

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, August 2016
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Title
Prevalence of bacterial resistance within an eco-agricultural system in Hangzhou, China
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7345-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xu, Like, Qian, Yanyun, Su, Chao, Cheng, Weixiao, Li, Jianan, Wahlqvist, Mark L, Chen, Hong

Abstract

The wide use of antibiotics in the animal husbandry and the relevant sustainable industries may promote the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), which constitutes a growing threat to human health. The objective of this study was to determine the abundance and diversity of sulfonamide- and tetracycline-resistant bacteria within an eco-agricultural system (EAS) in Hangzhou, China. We investigated samples at every link in the EAS, from livestock manure, to biogas residues and biogas slurry, to vegetable and ryegrass fields, to a fish pond. A combination of culture-based and 16S rRNA gene-based sequencing method was used in this study. Within the studied system, the average rate of bacterial resistance to sulfonamide (46.19 %) was much higher than that of tetracycline (8.51 %) (p < 0.01). There were 224 isolates that were enumerated and sequenced, 108 of which were identified to species level. The genera comprising the sulfamethoxazole-resistant (SMX(r)) bacteria were generally different from those of tetracycline-resistant (TC(r)) bacteria. Staphylococcus and Acinetobacter were the most dominant genera of SMX(r) bacteria (19.30 % of the total resistant bacteria) and TC(r) bacteria (14.04 % of the total resistant bacteria), respectively. Several strains of resistant opportunistic pathogens (e.g., Pantoea agglomerans) were detected in edible vegetable samples, which may exert a potential threat to both pig production and human health. In general, this study indicates that the EAS is an important reservoir of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, some of which may be pathogenic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 27%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 18%
Environmental Science 3 14%
Unspecified 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Engineering 2 9%
Other 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,089,925
of 8,192,854 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,426
of 2,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,380
of 257,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#108
of 154 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 2,168 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.