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Daily Substance Use and Mental Health Symptoms among a Cohort of Homeless Adults in Vancouver, British Columbia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Urban Health, October 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
Title
Daily Substance Use and Mental Health Symptoms among a Cohort of Homeless Adults in Vancouver, British Columbia
Published in
Journal of Urban Health, October 2012
DOI 10.1007/s11524-012-9775-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anita Palepu, Michelle Patterson, Verena Strehlau, Akm Moniruzzamen, Jason Tan de Bibiana, James Frankish, Michael Krausz, Julian Somers

Abstract

Substance use can be a barrier to stable housing for homeless persons with mental disorders. We examined DSM-IV symptoms among homeless adults (N = 497), comparing those who reported daily substance use (DSU) with non-daily substance users. Multivariable linear regression modeling was used to test the independent association between DSU and symptoms using the Colorado Symptom Index total score. DSU was independently associated with higher symptoms (beta = 3.67, 95 % CI 1.55-5.77) adjusting for homelessness history, age, gender, ethnicity, education, marital status, and mental disorder sub-type (adjusted R (2) = 0.24). We observed a higher prevalence of DSU in our sample than has been previously reported in a Housing First intervention. DSU was also independently associated with more DSM-IV symptomatology. We have an opportunity to observe this cohort longitudinally and examine if there are changes in substance use based on treatment assignment and commensurate changes in housing stability, community integration, health status, and quality of life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 63 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 25%
Student > Master 15 23%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Unspecified 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 31%
Social Sciences 17 26%
Psychology 11 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Unspecified 5 8%
Other 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2017.
All research outputs
#3,093,494
of 11,721,322 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Urban Health
#370
of 874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,727
of 126,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Urban Health
#6
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,721,322 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 874 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,137 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.