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A systematic review of the effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cognition

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neural Transmission, August 2016
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2 tweeters

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27 Dimensions

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162 Mendeley
Title
A systematic review of the effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cognition
Published in
Journal of Neural Transmission, August 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00702-016-1592-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudia Lage, Katherine Wiles, Sukhwinder S. Shergill, Derek K. Tracy

Abstract

rTMS is increasingly used for a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. There are data to support 'fast' rTMS (≥10 Hz) having some positive effects on cognitive functioning, but a dearth of research looking at any such effects of 'slow' rTMS. This question is important as cognitive dysfunction accompanies many neuropsychiatric conditions and neuromodulation that potentially enhances or hinders such functioning has important clinical consequences. To determine cognitive effects of slow (≤1 Hz) rTMS, a systematic review of randomized control trials assayed cognition in neurological, psychiatric, and healthy volunteer ≤1 Hz rTMS paradigms. Both active (fast rTMS) and placebo comparators were included. 497 Records were initially obtained; 20 met inclusion criteria for evaluation. Four major categories emerged: mood disorders; psychotic disorders; cerebrovascular accidents; and 'other' (PTSD, OCD, epilepsy, anxiety, and tinnitus). Cognitive effects were measured across several domains: attention, executive functioning, learning, and psychomotor speed. Variability of study paradigms and reporting precluded meta-analytical analysis. No statistically significant improvement or deterioration was consistently found in any cognitive domain or illness category. These data support the overall safety of rTMS in not adversely affecting cognitive functioning. There are some data indicating that rTMS might have cognitive enhancing potential, but these are too limited at this time to make any firm conclusions, and the literature is marked by considerable heterogeneity in study parameters that hinder interpretation. Greater consensus is required in future studies in cognitive markers, and particularly in reporting of protocols. Future work should evaluate the effects of rTMS on cognitive training.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 159 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 18%
Student > Bachelor 23 14%
Student > Master 21 13%
Researcher 17 10%
Student > Postgraduate 14 9%
Other 32 20%
Unknown 26 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 37 23%
Neuroscience 36 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 8 5%
Unknown 36 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2016.
All research outputs
#7,341,107
of 12,228,342 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neural Transmission
#769
of 1,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,647
of 266,076 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neural Transmission
#24
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,228,342 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,170 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.