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Maximal force and tremor changes across the menstrual cycle

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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70 Mendeley
Title
Maximal force and tremor changes across the menstrual cycle
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, September 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00421-015-3258-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew S. Tenan, Anthony C. Hackney, Lisa Griffin

Abstract

Sex hormones have profound effects on the nervous system in vitro and in vivo. The present study examines the effect of the menstrual cycle on maximal isometric force (MVC) and tremor during an endurance task. Nine eumenorrheic females participated in five study visits across their menstrual cycle. In each menstrual phase, an MVC and an endurance task to failure were performed. Tremor across the endurance task was quantified as the coefficient of variation in force and was assessed in absolute time and relative percent time to task failure. MVC decreases 23 % from ovulation to the mid luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In absolute time, the mid luteal phase has the highest initial tremor, though the early follicular phase has substantially higher tremor than other phases after 150 s of task performance. In relative time, the mid luteal phase has the highest level of tremor throughout the endurance task. Both MVC and tremor during an endurance task are modified by the menstrual cycle. Performance of tasks and sports which require high force and steadiness to exhaustion may be decreased in the mid luteal phase compared to other menstrual phases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 69 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Unspecified 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Lecturer 3 4%
Other 17 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 30 43%
Unspecified 14 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Other 10 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,755,795
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#1,769
of 2,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,842
of 266,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#33
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,771 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.