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Dependence and Addiction During Chronic Opioid Therapy

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Toxicology, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 449)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
Title
Dependence and Addiction During Chronic Opioid Therapy
Published in
Journal of Medical Toxicology, December 2012
DOI 10.1007/s13181-012-0269-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

David N. Juurlink, Irfan A. Dhalla

Abstract

The use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain has increased dramatically over the past 25 years in North America and has been accompanied by a major increase in opioid addiction and overdose deaths. The increase in opioid prescribing is multifactorial and partly reflects concerns about the effectiveness and safety of alternative medications, particularly the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, much of the rise in opioid prescribing reflects the assertion, widely communicated to physicians in the 1990s, that the risks of dependence and addiction during chronic opioid therapy were low, predictable, and could be minimized by the use of controlled-release opioid formulations. In this narrative review, we offer a critical appraisal of the publications most frequently cited as evidence that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is low. We conclude that very few well-designed studies support the notion that opioid addiction is rare during chronic opioid therapy and that none can be readily generalized to present-day practice. Despite serious methodological limitations, these studies have been repeatedly mischaracterized as showing that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is rare. These studies are countered by a larger, more rigorous and contemporary body of evidence demonstrating that dependence and addiction are relatively common consequences of chronic opioid therapy, occurring in up to one-third of patients in some series.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 104 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 16%
Researcher 17 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 11%
Other 12 11%
Other 35 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 40%
Unspecified 13 12%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 6%
Other 29 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 65. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2019.
All research outputs
#246,063
of 13,073,562 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Toxicology
#14
of 449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,012
of 141,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Toxicology
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,073,562 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 449 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 141,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.