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Marsh macrophyte responses to inundation anticipate impacts of sea-level rise and indicate ongoing drowning of North Carolina marshes

Overview of attention for article published in Marine Biology, October 2012
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Marsh macrophyte responses to inundation anticipate impacts of sea-level rise and indicate ongoing drowning of North Carolina marshes
Published in
Marine Biology, October 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00227-012-2076-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine M. Voss, Robert R. Christian, James T. Morris

Abstract

In situ persistence of coastal marsh habitat as sea level rises depends on whether macrophytes induce compensatory accretion of the marsh surface. Experimental planters in two North Carolina marshes served to expose two dominant macrophyte species to six different elevations spanning 0.75 m (inundation durations 0.4-99 %). Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus exhibited similar responses-with production in planters suggesting initial increases and then demonstrating subsequent steep declines with increasing inundation, conforming to a segment of the ecophysiological parabola. Projecting inundation levels experienced by macrophytes in the planters onto adjacent marsh platforms revealed that neither species occupied elevations associated with increasing production. Declining macrophyte production with rising seas reduces both bioaccumulation of roots below-ground and baffle-induced sedimentation above-ground. By occupying only descending portions of the parabola, macrophytes in central North Carolina marshes are responding to rising water levels by progressive declines in production, ultimately leading to marsh drowning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 3%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 62 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 29%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Master 8 12%
Other 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 29 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 28%
Unspecified 4 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 6%
Computer Science 3 5%
Other 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2012.
All research outputs
#2,902,796
of 3,616,388 outputs
Outputs from Marine Biology
#623
of 713 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,433
of 78,208 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Marine Biology
#31
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,616,388 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 713 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.